Referral

If you are feeling isolated, lonely, or that you don't belong. If you feel that life is passing you by then Curnie Clubs can provide you with a safe and welcoming space to rediscover yourself and build a new future. A future based on your own wishes, hopes and dreams. Meet other people and be part of a group that you feel you belong to.

If you wish to refer yourself or simply want to know more about Curnie Clubs then get in touch.

Caring professionals may also refer their patients and clients to Curnie Clubs.

Our referrers include smoking cessation, community and learning development, weight watchers, psychological services, job centres, drugs and alcohol services and social work.

What the referrers say:

“My client was given the opportunity to attend and meet new people and get out of the house on a regular basis. He was also able to contribute to the group using his management and culinary skills from his previous occupations.”

”I like to bring clients to you because you get them doing stuff which motivates them to do more for themselves.

Where are the Clubs?

Curnie Clubs are organised throughout Fife. It depends on how many potential members there are in the area. Recent Clubs have run in Dunfermline, Kirkcaldy and Leven

Membership

Curnie Club Members benefit from professional therapeutic group work that allows natural attributes, skills and abilities to emerge and be recognised. Members become self-sufficient and self-sustaining, enjoying personal development through peer support and new found friendships. They achieve in ways they had not envisaged they could.

Club members also enjoy day trips. This is usually cultural but some members find themselves fitting in a bit of shopping just as friends would normally do.

Donald Grieve, Curnie Club Manager says: “Some members like to swim but have not had anyone to go with. Curnie changes that and in certain circumstances we will fund activities that get you out of the house and meeting the new pals you have made.

“Curnie sessions are varied and very social, today the group made Stovies and had a discussion about how meals can be made within a tight budget. From this they have decided to produce a booklet of recipes based on the contents of a food bank bag and we would distribute them through the food bank. Everyone contributes in some way and everyone gains self-esteem, confidence and a sense of belonging."

Club Members will often discuss the effect their new experiences are having on themselves, family or friends.

“My confidence and self-esteem have increased significantly and I have made new friends and reconnected with old ones. I had a great time a good laugh and learned a lot. My outlook is more positive with more motivation “

We’re finding that after supported sessions are over some Members want to come to Clubs in other areas. They volunteer to welcome new Members and they understand how they feel when first coming along to their Club. An atmosphere of resilience and support has developed between Clubs Members.

“I would sit in the house and not venture out. I was very depressed and only got dressed to go for cat food. I was so isolated and felt there was nothing for me. I was helped to go to Curnie Club and I made friends. I now go out with my pals for days shopping in other towns and meet up for coffee. Curnie has made a big difference to my life.”

Members’ input is used not just to tailor our support and internal activities but to focus in choosing partner organisations. Though the Clubs are not an education or employability service, some Members cite these activities as their eventual goal. The Clubs can signpost or refer them on to one of our many partner services.

“Before coming to the club I didn’t have much of a life never meeting people. Curnie has helped me deal with my stress and trauma. Just being part of the group helped to relax me. I am moving on now attending IT classes because I just don’t want to slip back.”

Club Members have also worked together to raise money for, among other things, Cancer Research; the Children’s Liver Disease Foundation; and a small local charity, the Hyper Club, which works with children who are autistic.

As well as charity events, Members’ input has led to new activities such as environmental clean-up days and, most impressively perhaps, to the Curnie Volunteer Service. Curnie Club Members, in this respect, have moved from being isolated within communities, to becoming ‘community-makers’.

Related downloads

Curnie Clubs leafletCurnie Clubs leaflet

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